Reporting guides on Buddhism

  • Reporting on hate speech

    In 2010, a Florida pastor with just a few dozen followers attracted international media coverage when he announced plans to burn copies of the Quran on the anniversary of 9/11. By taking the bait, media outlets became complicit in advancing his hate-filled agenda, making Terry Jones a household name in the U.S. and far beyond. […]

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Source guides on Buddhism

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Covering creation care in the age of Donald Trump

President Donald Trump has undone or renegotiated many of his predecessor’s environmentally friendly policies, removing climate change research from government websites and pulling out of the Paris climate agreement. Religiously inspired environmental activists have emerged as some of his loudest critics.

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Stylebook entries on Buddhism

ahimsa
Pronounced “ah-HIM-saa.” The Sanskrit word meaning non-injury in any form, including action, thought or speech. This is an important principle of Hinduism and a core principle of Jainism. For this reason, many Hindus and most Jains are vegetarians, as are significant numbers of Sikhs and Buddhists.
Amida
Pronounced “ah-MEE-dah.” Japanese name of the Buddha of Infinite Light, a celestial Buddha venerated in Chinese and Japanese Mahayana Pure Land schools, which teach that calling upon the Buddha’s name (Namu-Amida-Butsu, “Veneration to the Buddha Amida”) will bring them into his paradise, or state of Buddhahood. His name is also seen in its Sanskrit form, Amitabha (pronounced “A-mi-TAH-bhah”). See Pure Land school.
arhat
Pronounced “AAR-het.” In early Buddhism, one who has attained full realization and transcended desires and defilements and who thus will not be reborn. It is the ideal goal in the Theravada tradition. In Pali, it is called arahant.
bhikkhu
Pronounced “BHIK-koo.” A fully ordained monk in the Theravada Buddhist tradition; a nun is a bhikkhuni. In the Mahayana tradition, the Sanskrit forms (bhikshu, bhikshuni) are used. Capitalize when used with a name.
Bodh Gaya
Pronounced “Bohd guh-YAA.” The site in northeast India of the tree under which the meditating Buddha attained realization.

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Organizations on Buddhism

  • Roshie Bernie Glassman

    Roshie Bernie Glassman heads the Massachusetts-based Zen Peacemakers. Contact through assistant Rami.

  • Claude AnShin Thomas

    Claude AnShin Thomas is an author, peace activist, Zen monk and Vietnam veteran. In 1994, he founded the Zaltho Foundation, a spiritually based nonprofit committed to ending violence. The foundation, which is based in Fort Walton Beach, Fla., offers mindfulness meditation retreats to veterans and their families to help them deal with the emotional, psychological and spiritual wounds of war.

  • Buddhist Peace Fellowship

    The Buddhist Peace Fellowship works for peace from diverse Buddhist perspectives. It’s based in Berkeley, Calif. Dawn Haney and Katie Loncke are co-directors.

  • The Tibetan Book of the Dead

    The Tibetan Book of the Dead, or Bardo Thodol, records the stages of death and rebirth. It is intended to guide one through the bardo, or the conscious interval between death and rebirth.

  • Buddhist Sutras

    The Sutras are held sacred by Mahayana Buddhists. They are a loose collection of texts designed to unify contradictions among the various teachings and thus very difficult to describe succinctly.

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FAQs on Buddhism

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