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Carole M. Cusack

Carole M. Cusack is professor of religious studies at the University of Sydney, Australia. Trained as a medievalist, Cusack has taught about contemporary religious trends, publishing on pilgrimage and tourism, modern pagan religions, new religious movements, the interface between religion and politics, and religion and popular culture since the 1990s.

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David G. Bromley

David G. Bromley is a professor of sociology at Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. He specializes in sociology of religion, with a particular emphasis on the study of New Religious Movements and the anti-cult movement. He is co-editor of Cults, Religion, and Violence.    

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Mark Satta

Mark Satta is a professor of philosophy at Wayne State University. He focuses on epistemology, philosophy of language and philosophy of law.

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Farrah Raza

Farrah Raza is a  lecturer in public law at Pembroke College, University of Oxford. Her research includes law and religion, public law, human rights and discrimination law.

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Douglas Hallward-Driemeier

Douglas Hallward-Driemeier leads law firm Ropes & Gray’s appellate and Supreme Court practice. He has presented nearly 100 appellate arguments, including 18 times before the U.S. Supreme Court and before every federal circuit court of appeals. He advocated for the respondents in Shurtleff v. Boston.

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Mathew D. Staver

Mathew D. Staver is an American lawyer and former Seventh-day Adventist pastor. Formerly, he was dean of Liberty University’s Law School. He founded Liberty Counsel in 1989 and serves as chairman. He advocated for Harold Shurtleff in Shurtleff v. Boston.

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Religious Liberty Initiative

The Religious Liberty Initiative at the University of Notre Dame School of Law promotes religious freedom for people of all faiths through scholarship, events and the Law School’s Religious Liberty Clinic.

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