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João Chaves

João Chaves is associate director for programming at the Hispanic Theological Initiative and assistant professor of evangelism and mission at Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary. He has written on migration, evangelical history in the U.S. and Brazil, and on evangelicals’ relationship to politics in the Americas.

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Reporting on Modern Paganism

In June 2022, after a two-year hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Circle Sanctuary’s Pagan Spirit Gathering (PSG) was back at the Pulaski County Fort Leonard Wood Shrine Camp in Waynesville, Missouri. Featuring daily concerts, ritual workshops and scores of pagan vendors offering sacred art, jewelry, magickal tools, drums, altar paraphernalia, candles, psychic readings, […]

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Harold Morales

Harold Morales is associate professor and director of the Center for the Study of Religion and the City, department of philosophy and religious studies at Morgan State University in Baltimore. His research focuses on the intersections between race and religion and between lived and mediated experience. He uses these critical lenses to engage Latinx religions in general and Latino […]

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Jenevieve Mannell

Jenevieve Mannell is an associate professor in the University College London’s Institute for Global Health, specializing in the prevention of violence among women in places such as Afghanistan, India, Peru, Samoa and South Africa.

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Sabreena Ghaffar-Siddiqui

Sabreena Ghaffar-Siddiqui is a media pundit, researcher and human rights advocate. Her sociological research focuses on the areas of migration, race/ethnicity, politics and ethno-religious diasporic identity.

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Angela Denker

Angela Denker, a veteran journalist and Lutheran pastor, is author of Red State Christians: A Journey Into White Christian Nationalism and the Wreckage It Leaves Behind.

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